Sawing To The Solution?

About 1/3 of the way through marathon cross-cut number two

A confession: Hi my name is John and I’m a crappy sawyer.

I’ve gotten along well enough with most of the woodworking skills.  I’m confident working with chisels and hand planes.  But though my saws are well-sharpened I have not yet learned to cut straight and square.  I have a saw-bench that is the right height, but on the cuts with the large saws the cut will usually dive to my left on the under-side of the board.

Tonight I might have figured it out.  I cut off the ends of my bench top with my 26″ cross-cut saw.  I cut one end one night, and the other end the next night.  I need to pace myself.  Half-way through the second cut I realized that, right at the end of the saw-stroke I’m pushing the saw to the right so that my hand and the tote don’t block my view of the line.  I’m trying to view the line as long as possible.  During the rest of that cut I focused on just pushing the saw through the kerf and holding it in-line with the kerf best I could.  It felt much different.  Now I have to try to remember this the next time I’m sawing, and see how it goes.

Also – pictured is my Spear and Jackson saw.  It’s sweet.  Nothing against the Disstons and their relatives.  But there are a lot of other good ones out there too.

My sweet S&J saw endured me through two of these cuts

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The Slab Has Landed

 

Scary Potential Energy

Here are two photos showing how I got the Roubo bench top mounted on the undercarriage.  The top is salvaged (dry) fir measuring a full 5″ thick by 24 3/4″ by 8′ long.  A quick estimate put that at 200 pounds.  I hooked my winch to the anchor-point in the overhead floor-joists (everyone has one of those, right?) and lifted the top enough to slide the legs under it.  The plan is to not bother pinning the top to the legs.

Once the top was united with the legs I was happy to find that I have to use all my weight to budge the bench just a tiny bit.

Inertia

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Roubo Undercarriage

 

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1/2″ and 3/4″ pegs (and MDF, ew)

Photos of the undercarriage of the Roubo bench. It’s all oak that I think was salvaged that I found at Siwek Lumber.  The 1/2″ pegs on the short stretchers are blind.  The single 3/4″ pegs on the long stretchers go through.  I used hide-glue and draw-bored everything very slightly.  No clamps needed – just hammer the pegs home and you’re done.  (I forget why I had the two aluminum clamps in the one photo.  Maybe I was using them to test-fit everything.)

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Making Pegs For The Roubo Bench

The undercarriage of the Roubo bench is more like timber framing than woodworking.  It’s just 4 legs, and four stretchers connecting them.  My legs are 3 1/2″ by 5 1/4″ oak.  I needed pegs to draw-bore it all together.  I didn’t want to use dowels from the store as my pegs because they usually have a lot of grain going in the wrong direction.  I didn’t trust them to be able to take the beating I was going to give them.  Making pegs was a good exercise.  I made a nice dowel plate, and made myself pegs that I know have little to no grain runout.

Before you can bash the pegs through the plate you have to get them close in size so I used the drew knife a lot.

So that they didn’t collide I used two 1/2″ pegs for the short stretchers and a single 3/4″ peg for the long stretchers. Only the 3/4″ pegs go all the way through.  I’ll post pictures of those soon.

I was disappointed to find that my Irwin bits didn’t fit the pegs well. They were a bit oversized. So I used brad point bits to drill the holes. That allowed me to drill them with my drill press though which was a good thing.

Making sticks smaller

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Handworks 2017

I was on a roll for a couple months, doing more woodworking than I had in a while.  Then the end of April I accepted a new job at Penguin Computing and I have done no woodworking since.  That is temporary though.  I’m confident that once I get up to speed on the new gig I’ll have more time at home than before.  I’m not there yet though.

There is one exception of woodworking I’ve done recently.  That was that I was able to attend Handworks #3.  I travelled down with the Naked Woodworker and his crew, and helped him set up his booth.  The project Mike was doing in his booth continued with his aim to help people do less wood-watching and more woodworking.  He provided the materials and tools needed, as well as coaching, to help people build their own Moxon vise.  It was a hit, and he ran out of materials early the second day.

Roy Underhill again gave the keynote performance, and here’s a very good video of that.

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Fun With Tenons

Veritas large shoulder plane on the work piece which is on my shooting board

I’ve resumed working on my Roubo workbench, which means timber frame-sized mortise and tenons. I recently sold my rabbet block plane. I bought it hoping it would do double duty as both a block plane and a shoulder plane. It was a good block plane but I didn’t like it at all as a rabbet/shoulder plane.  While working a tenon like in this photo, for example, the low profile makes the plane too hard to hold.  The tall shoulder plane works great in my hands. This plane is on loan from a friend.

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Band Saw Tires

New tire on an old saw. The old tire is on the table.

My 14″ band saw threw the lower tire the other day. The tire balled up in the lower corner and jammed up the whole works bringing the motor to a stop. I’ve thought about replacing the 3/4 hp motor with a more powerful one and I wonder what would have happened with the ball of old hard rubber had the motor not given up so easily. Would it have been rammed up toward the table? And what would have had to give way to make a path?

I’ve never been able to get this saw to track well.  The riser block on it is silly given the poor tracking and lack of power.  Would more power fix all on this?  I’m inclined to take the riser off.  More to come …

 

 

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